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Organizations in Tallahassee tackle need for food after tornado

Posted at 6:04 PM, May 21, 2024
  • The distribution was funded by United Way of the Big Bend, and it took place in the Sabal Palm neighborhood.
  • Those organizations were out using the new lot owned by CCYS, to help feed 250 families.
  • Watch the video above to hear from neighbors waiting in line to receive something they've been waiting on since the recent storm passed.

BROADCAST TRANSCRIPT

“I was home by myself! I was so scared because my husband was working so I just got on my knees and started praying.”

Sharn Summers lives in Southwest Tallahassee. She says she’s experienced storms, but none quite like the recent.

“It was scary! It was really scary, but I know that I was taught to call on the name of Jesus and ask God to protect me”

Like other neighbors… Summers knows the tornado that hit Tallahassee left many without food.

“I see how the trees just messed up houses and crashed cars… Their food got spoiled and everything.”

We told you about crews working to restore power, remove trees, and other debris… now organizations like Second Harvest of the Big Bend and Capital city youth services joined together to distribute food.

The distribution was funded by United Way of the Big Bend, and it took place in the Sabal Palm neighborhood… an area that got hit hard from the recent storm and is considered a food desert.

“We just feel so lucky to be the position to do another distribution like this. The goal this week is to do really targeted distributions.”

CEO of Second Harvest of the Big Bend. Monique Ellsworth, tells me this distribution will have a positive impact on neighbors living here…

It’s something President and CEO of United Way of the Big Bend, Bernice Cox, agrees with.

“I absolutely believe this is a step in the right direction. When you are hurting for food; for the bare necessities of food and water, we’re filling that need… that is critical.”

Those organizations were out using the new lot owned by CCYS, to help feed 250 families.

Summers tells me no matter what she’ll be grateful.

“We got to appreciate what they give us!”