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Neighbors in SW Tallahassee help kids stay ahead of the curve with performing arts camp

Posted at 6:03 PM, Jun 06, 2024
  • The program consists of 44 kids total.
  • The U.S. News and World Report says for "Out of School" summer programs, arts education benefits students K-12 by keep them engaged with school, develop interpersonal skills, and bolster academic achievement.
  • Watch the video above to hear from kids in the summer camp and those leading the way.

BROADCAST TRANSCRIPT

"A lot of kids at my school like singing and dancing. The teachers care… they just want us to have fun and be safe."

Kids like Craig Swain are out of school for summer break. This means it's time for summer camp for some children.

When you think of summer camp, you may think of outdoor activities like hiking, swimming, and things of that nature. But this summer camp in Southwest Tallahassee focuses on educating kids academically and through music.

"Through statistics, we know the effect that the arts have on our kids, and without it; you can see them academically decreasing in many ways."

Darius "Doc D" Baker and the Children Service's Council partnered to run this camp at the Tallahassee Nights Live Performing Arts Center on South Monroe Street.

"We've always invested in our kids, but now we have a headquarters that we can do this on a bigger scale."

The camp consists of reading, dance, art, singing and songwriting classes.

Doc D tells me Children's Services Council pays for the first 35 kids, and parents pay a low fee for the ones over the 35 mark. The program consists of 44 kids.

The camp is in year two and for the first time, the program lasts the full day. "Doc D" and others decided the performance and academic-based camp helps children in our community.

I checked how this helps. The U.S. News and World Report says for "Out of School" summer programs, arts education benefits students K-12 by keep them engaged with school, develop interpersonal skills, and bolster academic achievement.

"We live in a rural area that needs the education and we want to put emphasis on getting our students to the higher reading levels through music… We want them academically to be somebody and musically be somebody."

TNL Program Director, Antonio Wimberly, says the meaning of the camp is simple.

"I utilize music to connect with them!"

A connection and lessons kids like Craig Swain appreciates.

"It's a fun place to be, we just vibe."