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"We're at our wits end!" - How SW Tallahassee neighbors are coping with tornado damage days after storm

Posted at 6:28 PM, May 14, 2024
and last updated 2024-05-14 18:28:43-04
  • A tornado led to major damage at the Tanglewood Estates in Southwest Tallahassee.
  • Area groups are giving out non-perishable items, water, batteries, and other essential needs, serving over 4,000 families since Saturday.
  • Watch the video above to hear from neighbors and who's stepping in to help those who need food.

BROADCAST TRANSCRIPT

"I jumped up out my bed, slammed my window down, I didn't know what to do or where to go!"

Amy Thompson-Sancir lives at the Tanglewood Estates in Southwest Tallahassee.

She was reliving the moments Friday's storm rolled through hitting her neighborhood.

I asked her how she's doing now days after the storm.

"Not good at all, not good at all!"

Amy's neighborhood got hit so badly from the storm. Trees are still resting on roofs of homes.

Even splitting this mobile home in half.

She uses this chair to climb through this window to get in and out of her home.

But that's only part of the problem.

"There's so many families, friends, everything here that needs food. There's nothing here for us."

I went a couple houses down to ask her neighbor if he's experiencing the same thing.

"It's day by day right now. You can't think long range, you have to think day by day. We're at our wits end!"

Kevin Trofatter tells me the neighborhood is doing what they can for food, so I went to the nearest food distribution site to see who's stepping in to fill the need.

"It's a team effort, you have a combination of state agencies, the private sector, local government coming together to make this happen."

Secretary of the Department of Children Services, Shevaun Harris, says they're giving out non-perishable items, water, batteries, and other essential needs, serving over 4,000 families since Saturday.

I asked Harris what's the plan for neighbors like Amy who can't physically go to the distribution. She tells me.

"We have HOPE navigators who are able to go into neighborhoods and assess needs of individuals who aren't able to come out to one of these sites."

An answer neighbors like Amy want to hear.

"Oh my God! Yes, I would. I would love for some food distributions to come in here!"