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Meadows booked in Georgia ahead of Trump

Mark Meadows was booked into the Fulton County jail on two charges, including violating the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.
Meadows booked in Georgia ahead of Trump
Posted at 3:28 PM, Aug 24, 2023
and last updated 2023-08-24 15:53:13-04

Mark Meadows, who served as the White House chief of staff under President Donald Trump, turn himself in to authorities in Georgia on Thursday. 

Meadows was booked at the Fulton County jail on charges of violating Georgia's Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act and soliciting a public officer to violate their oath. He was released on a $100,000 bond. 

Meadows, who is listed as 6-foot-1 and 240 pounds, was one of 19 people, including Trump, to be indicted this month for their campaign to overturn the 2020 presidential election in Georgia. 

Another defendant, Harrison Floyd, a leader of a pro-Trump group, also surrendered on Thursday but a bond had not been negotiated, so he remains in custody. 

All of the defendants have until Friday to turn themselves in. Trump is expected to surrender Thursday afternoon. 

SEE MORE: Giuliani arrested, released in Georgia election case

On Wednesday, other high-profile defendants, including former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, turned themselves in. Personal details revealed on his booking sheet included his height, which was listed as 5-foot-11. He weighed 230 pounds. Giuliani was released on a $150,000 bond. 

Attorneys Sidney Powell and Jenna Ellison also surrendered on Wednesday and were subsequently released. 

The indictments came after a two year investigation into Trump's attempts to subvert the will of the Georgia voters. He lost the state to Joe Biden, but was heard on a recorded call with the Georgia secretary of state asking him to "find" the votes he needed to win. 

Trump has denied any wrongdoing, claiming the entire case is a "political witch-hunt" and "election interference." However, each defendant will be given a chance to enter their own plea and decide whether they want their case to head to trial. 


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