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BE AWARE: Prescribed burn in Wakulla County expected to bring smoke to the Tallahassee

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Posted at 6:14 PM, Jun 04, 2024

UPDATE JUNE 5:

The Apalachicola National Forest fire management team is doing a prescribed burn of about 2,000 acres today, beginning at 10 a.m., using hand-held torches and aircraft to start small fires in strategic areas.

VIDEO OF THE SMOKE CAPTURED ON WEATHERSTEM CAM BELOW:

Apalachicola National Forest fire management team doing prescribed burn of about 2,000 acres

The location of this burn is west of the Sopchoppy River, and south of FH-13 in Bradwell Bay, in Wakulla County. Prescribed fires are good for the forest, wildlife and entire eco-system. Many plants and trees need fire to grow and thrive. And burning away excess or invasive vegetation helps prevent bigger and more dangerous wildfires in the future.

Each forest team is trained to do prescribed burns when weather conditions (that day) are best for safely controlling fire. Forest staff also use fire warning signs, temporary road closures and detours for public safety.

If you’re driving, biking or hiking around this forest, please pay extra attention to the signs. Be prepared to stop and turn around, watch out for animals near the road, and please do not enter the prescribed burn areas.

Call 911 to report smoke or fire emergencies anywhere (on or off the forests). Our joint interagency fire team conducts a ‘Smoke Check’ to ensure public and forest fire safety around the clock.

ORIGINAL STORY:

The Apalachicola National Forest fire management team is expected to do a prescribed burn of about 14,000 acres Wednesday, June 5.

The burn will begin at 10 a.m.

Teams will be using hand-held torches and aircraft to start small fires in strategic areas.

The location of this burn is west of the Sopchoppy River, and south of FH-13 in Bradwell Bay, in Wakulla County.

 

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Due to the size of the prescribed burn, the U.S. Forest Service National Fire says people living in Tallahassee and people living around Lake Talquin are likely to see smoke in the area.

Fire officials say the prescribed fires are good for the forest, wildlife and entire eco-system.

In a Facebook post, it explains the fires help many plants and trees need fire to grow and thrive.

 

Forest staff also use fire warning signs, temporary road closures and detours for public safety.

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Forest officials warns, if you’re driving, biking or hiking around this forest, please pay extra attention to the signs.

Be prepared to stop and turn around, watch out for animals near the road, and do not enter the prescribed burn areas.