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Aspiring Fla. dentists, hygienists ask Gov. to change exam rules for licensure amid coronavirus concerns

Fla. Board of Dentistry supports one-time waiver, exemptions
Aspiring Fla. dentists, hygienists ask Gov. to change exam rules for licensure amid coronavirus concerns
Posted at 4:39 PM, May 18, 2020
and last updated 2020-05-19 12:02:34-04

Future Fla. Dentists, Hygienists Ask For Waivers On Licensing Exam

The Florida Board of Dentistry and Florida Dental Association are asking the governor to waive certain requirements to become a state-licensed dentist or hygienist.


The two organizations support a one-time waiver that would allow dental examinees to perform two of their mandatory exams on a mannequin instead of a live patient.


Fear of the coronavirus has made it difficult for examinees to recruit subjects willing to undergo the procedures.


The governor needs to sign an executive order before the waiver can become official.


FLORIDA — For the first time in Florida history, the state Board of Dentistry is asking the Governor to support a one-time waiver on some exam rules to become a licensed dentist or hygienist in the state.

Last month, the Board of Dentistry approved its support of a measure that would waive one of the dental and dental hygiene exams that demonstrates an examinees’ ability to perform a deep cleaning properly.

The board also discussed and voted in favor of supporting a move that, for the first time, would allow dental examinees to perform some exams on a mannequin instead of a live patient.

Last week, the Florida Dental Association also approved its support of these changes to licensing requirements.

The support came after the Florida board heard a presentation by the American Board of Dental Examiners (ADEX) on their non-patient based exam alternative. The waivers do not become official until Governor Ron DeSantis signs off on the changes in an executive order.

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Hundreds of recent graduates at several dental schools around the state have been stuck in limbo since the shut down canceled their licensure exams back in March.

“Kind of pulling our hair out right now,” said Daniel May, who graduated from the Lake Eerie College of Osteopathic Medicine last week.

But without taking and passing his board exams, May can’t start his career as a licensed dentist or start paying off his student loans.

“We’ve done everything we can, and now we have something we can’t control holding us back,” said May.

Part of the exam calls for students to bring in patients who they can perform high stakes dental procedures on. But May said, finding patients willing to be subjects during the pandemic has been a logistical nightmare even after he’s offered them several incentives.

“Free dental work, $1,000 cash and we would pay for travel and housing and they just said they weren’t interested,” he said.

May also said he’s performed the deep cleaning “hundreds of times” and the other dental procedures many times throughout his dental school career. He believes replacing human patients with a mannequin is a reasonable compromise given the coronavirus crisis.

Dr. Rudy Liddell, a Brandon dentist and President of the Florida Dental Association, agrees. Liddell said the pass rate on mannequin tests are actually lower than on live patients, so consumers should not be concerned the changes reduce any rigor on the licensing exam.

“It’s actually a harder exam. I don’t think the public has anything to worry about,” Liddell said.

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On Monday, Liddell sent a letter to Governor DeSantis asking for swift action on an executive order to allow the temporary rule changes.

“I’m hopeful that he will consider this is a unique situation, and we’re doing this to help a segment of our student body in need,” he said.

Until the Governor signs off on the proposed changes, recent dental graduates, including Daniel May, remain stuck.

“I’ve had to move back home with my family right now,” he said after completing four years of college and another four years of dental school. “It’s a very pressing time on all of us.”