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Lowndes Co. mosquitoes test positive for West Nile

Mosquitoes
Posted at 12:10 PM, Jun 28, 2018
and last updated 2018-06-28 14:15:46-04

VALDOSTA, GA (WALB) - LOWNDES CO., GA (WALB) - More mosquitoes tested positive for West Nile Virus in -Valdosta-Lowndes County. 

The Georgia Department of Public Health--South District has just confirmed that only two weeks after the Valdosta State University Mosquito Surveillance Lab received the initial test results back, revealing the virus was present in the county.

The city of Valdosta has already been spraying for mosquitoes, but now the spray time has been increased from two hours to three.

They feel more needs to be done to fight the insects after the recent rainfall. 

"Everyone needs to play their part, and make sure their properties are free of standing water, if you have tires, flower pots, bird bathes, those things need to be treated with larvicide," said Richard Hardy. 


VALDOSTA, GA (WALB) - LOWNDES CO., GA (WALB) - Two more batches of mosquitoes in Lowndes County have tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV), according to the Georgia Department of Public Health's South District.

Earlier in June, a batch of mosquitoes tested positive for WNV.

People are urged to take the following precautions:

Use insect repellent containing DEET, Picaridin, IR3535, or PMD.  Be sure to follow the instructions on the label. 

Any containers that can collect water should be discarded or dumped daily.

Wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and socks when outdoors, especially at dawn and dusk to reduce the amount of exposed skin, as weather permits.

Avoid being outdoors from dusk to dawn, peak mosquito biting times, if possible.

Set up outdoor fans to keep mosquitoes from flying near you.

Copyright 2018 WALB. All rights reserved.


VALDOSTA, GA (WALB) - Public Health Officials have been notified numerous mosquitoes tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV) in Lowndes County.

Officials say that South Georgians need to guard against exposure to mosquitoes. 

"Mosquito-borne illnesses are spread through the bite of an infected mosquito," said William Grow, MD, FACP, district health director. "The more time someone is outdoors, the more time the person is at risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito. That is why we encourage everyone to take all precautions against mosquito bites."

People are urged to take the following precautions:

Use insect repellent containing DEET, Picaridin, IR3535, or PMD.  Be sure to follow the instructions on the label. 

Any containers that can collect water should be discarded or dumped daily.

Wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and socks when outdoors, especially at dawn and dusk to reduce the amount of exposed skin, as weather permits.

Avoid being outdoors from dusk to dawn, peak mosquito biting times, if possible.

Set up outdoor fans to keep mosquitoes from flying near you.

"While most people infected with West Nile Virus show no symptoms of the illness and pass it on their own, even healthy people have become severely ill for weeks when infected," says Dr. Grow.  "EEE is extremely rare in humans; however, is extremely concerning because it involves inflammation of the brain."

Copyright 2018 WALB. All rights reserved.