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Local women react to state not paying for medicare insurance

Local women react to state not paying for medicare insurance
Local women react to state not paying for medicare insurance
Posted at 5:45 PM, May 17, 2018
and last updated 2018-05-17 14:17:53-04

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) - Some Florida residents who are unable to work are in fear after the state withdraws some of the funding they rely on to pay their medical insurance.

Federal health officials say about 3.3 million Floridians are enrolled in Medicare.

"If I didn't have my faith, I would be dead by now," said Michele Weiss.

The state no longer pays her medical insurance. Faith is a huge deal for Weiss, who lives with her dog Jireh.

The two look out for each other as Weiss has cerebral palsy, a condition that affects her muscles and movements.

"It's like putting a new motor in an old car, because the brain is OK but the parts aren't working," said Weiss.

But as of two weeks ago, she doesn't know if she will have a home.

"I could be living out of my car if they do this to me," said Weiss.

Two weeks ago, Weiss got a letter in the mail saying that the state of Florida will no longer pay for her medicare part B, or her medical insurance premiums after March, and that she will have to pay the premiums starting in April.

"My check in June is going to be $420 less than I normally get," said Weiss.

The same goes for Nancy Decrevel, a disabled senior who recently got evicted for not being able to pay her bills.

"I'm in fear of of my life, I am literally in fear of my life, I don't know how I am going to manage and I don't like the fact that disabled people are now being released as the label as disposable because we are not," said Decrevel. "We are broken, not dead people and I'm in fear of my life." 

Weiss is currently re-applying for medical insurance while Decrevel is trying to get her stuff into a storage unit.

State officials say 33 states enacted the medicaid program which covers insurance policies and Florida was not one of them.

They also say if you have questions about medicare or medicaid, contact your local health insurance provider.