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For Your Protection: Nightclub Safety

Nightclub Safety
Posted at 5:50 PM, Jan 29, 2013
and last updated 2014-02-20 06:32:08-05

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) -- As the country mourns, police in Brazil are arresting those they believe are responsible for last weekend's deadly nightclub fire.

Authorities say they've arrested two of the club owners and two members of the band that lit flares, igniting the sound-proofing. The ceiling fire extinguishers failed leaving fire to spread quickly, choking some 2,000 panicked college students celebrating graduation.

Firefighters say there was only one exit door.

 

 

While this story may come from around the world, it can happen anywhere.

(Watch the video below to see Lt. Mike Bellamy with Tallahassee Fire Department discuss ways to stay safe while attending events with large crowds.)

The National Fire Protection Association recounts the 10 deadliest public assembly and nightclub fires in U.S. History:

1. Iroquois Theater (PDF, 408 KB), Chicago, IL December 30, 1903.

Deaths: 602

2. Cocoanut Grove nightclub, Boston, MA

November 28, 1942

Deaths: 492

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 6.3 MB)

3. Conway's Theater, Brooklyn, NY December 5, 1876

Deaths: 285

4. Rhythm Club dance hall, Natchez, MS April 23, 1940

Deaths: 207

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 940 KB)

5. Rhoads Opera House, Boyertown, PA

January 13, 1908

Deaths: 170

6. Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus tent (PDF, 623 KB), Hartford, CT

July 6, 1944

Deaths: 168

7. Beverly Hills Supper Club, Southgate, KY

May 28, 1977

Deaths: 165

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 7.3 MB)

8. The Station nightclub, W. Warwick, RI February 20, 2003

Deaths: 100

9. Happy Land Social Club, Bronx, NY March 25, 1990

Deaths: 87

Members: NFPA Alert Bulletin (PDF 247 KB)

10. Richmond Theater, Richmond, VA

December 26, 1811 Deaths: 72

Source: NFPA files on major fire incidents Updated: 11/12

 

 

NFPA fire codes ensure that a number of safety systems are in place to keep everyone safe in the event of a fire. NFPA has the following safety tips to consider when attending events with large crowds:

 

· Take a good look. Does the building appear to be in a condition that makes you feel comfortable? Is the main entrance wide and does it open outward to allow easy exit? Is the outside area clear of materials stored against the building or blocking exits?

· Have a communication plan

Identify a relative or friend to contact in case of emergency and you are separated from family or friends.

· Plan a meeting place

Pick a meeting place outside to meet family or friends with whom you are attending the function. If there is an emergency, be sure to meet them there.

When you enter

· Locate exits immediately

When you enter a building you should look for all available exits. Some exits may be in front and some in back of you. Be prepared to use your closest exit. You may not be able to use the main exit.

· Check for clear exit paths

Make sure aisles are wide enough and not obstructed by chairs or furniture. Check to make sure your exit door is not blocked or chained. If there are not at least two exits or exit paths are blocked, report the violation to management and leave the building if it is not immediately addressed. Call the local fire marshal to register a complaint.

· Do you feel safe?

Does the building appear to be overcrowded? Are there fire sources such as candles burning, cigarettes or cigars burning, pyrotechnics, or other heat sources that may make you feel unsafe? Are there safety systems in place such as alternative exits, sprinklers, and smoke alarms? Ask the management for clarification on your concerns. If you do not feel safe in the building, leave immediately.

 

 

During an emergency

· React immediately

If an alarm sounds, you see smoke or fire, or other unusual disturbance immediately exit the building in an orderly fashion.

· Get out, stay out!

Once you have escaped, stay out. Under no circumstances should you ever go back into a burning building. Let trained firefighters conduct rescue operations.

 

 

The 10 deadliest nightclub fires in world history

1. Cocoanut Grove nightclub, Boston, MA

November 28, 1942

Deaths: 492

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 6.3 MB)

2. Disco/dance hall, Luoyang, China. (Fire began elsewhere in shopping plaza and spread to disco.) December 25, 2000

Deaths: 309

3. Rhythm Club dance hall, Natchez, MS April 23, 1940

Deaths: 207

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 940 KB)

4. Cromagnon Republic club, Buenos Aires, Argentina

December 30, 2004

Deaths: 194

5. Beverly Hills Supper Club, Southgate, KY

May 28, 1977

Deaths: 165

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 7.3 MB)

6. Ozone Disco Club, Quezon City, Philippines March 18, 1996

Deaths: 160

7. Lame Horse Nightclub, Perm, Russia

December 4, 2009

Deaths: 154 (best information available as of January 7, 2010)

8. Club Cinq, St. Laurent du Pont, France

November 20, 1971

Deaths: 143

9. The Station nightclub, W. Warwick, RI

February 20, 2003

Deaths: 100

10. HappyLandSocialClub,Bronx,NY

March 25, 1990

Deaths: 87

 

 As the country mourns, police in Brazil are arresting those they believe are responsible for last weekend's deadly nightclub fire.

Authorities say they've arrested two of the club owners and two members of the band that lit flares, igniting the sound-proofing. The ceiling fire extinguishers failed leaving fire to spread quickly, choking some 2,000 panicked college students celebrating graduation.

Firefighters say there was only one exit door.

While this story may come from around the world, it can happen anywhere.

(Watch the video below to see Lt. Mike Bellamy with Tallahassee Fire Department discuss ways to stay safe while attending events with large crowds.)

 

The National Fire Protection Association recounts the 10 deadliest public assembly and nightclub fires in U.S. History:

1. Iroquois Theater (PDF, 408 KB), Chicago, IL December 30, 1903.

Deaths: 602

2. Cocoanut Grove nightclub, Boston, MA

November 28, 1942

Deaths: 492

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 6.3 MB)

3. Conway's Theater, Brooklyn, NY December 5, 1876

Deaths: 285

4. Rhythm Club dance hall, Natchez, MS April 23, 1940

Deaths: 207

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 940 KB)

5. Rhoads Opera House, Boyertown, PA

January 13, 1908

Deaths: 170

6. Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus tent (PDF, 623 KB), Hartford, CT

July 6, 1944

Deaths: 168

7. Beverly Hills Supper Club, Southgate, KY

May 28, 1977

Deaths: 165

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 7.3 MB)

8. The Station nightclub, W. Warwick, RI February 20, 2003

Deaths: 100

9. Happy Land Social Club, Bronx, NY March 25, 1990

Deaths: 87

Members: NFPA Alert Bulletin (PDF 247 KB)

10. Richmond Theater, Richmond, VA

December 26, 1811 Deaths: 72

Source: NFPA files on major fire incidents Updated: 11/12

NFPA fire codes ensure that a number of safety systems are in place to keep everyone safe in the event of a fire. NFPA has the following safety tips to consider when attending events with large crowds:

· Take a good look. Does the building appear to be in a condition that makes you feel comfortable? Is the main entrance wide and does it open outward to allow easy exit? Is the outside area clear of materials stored against the building or blocking exits?

· Have a communication plan

Identify a relative or friend to contact in case of emergency and you are separated from family or friends.

· Plan a meeting place

Pick a meeting place outside to meet family or friends with whom you are attending the function. If there is an emergency, be sure to meet them there.

When you enter

· Locate exits immediately

When you enter a building you should look for all available exits. Some exits may be in front and some in back of you. Be prepared to use your closest exit. You may not be able to use the main exit.

· Check for clear exit paths

Make sure aisles are wide enough and not obstructed by chairs or furniture. Check to make sure your exit door is not blocked or chained. If there are not at least two exits or exit paths are blocked, report the violation to management and leave the building if it is not immediately addressed. Call the local fire marshal to register a complaint.

· Do you feel safe?

Does the building appear to be overcrowded? Are there fire sources such as candles burning, cigarettes or cigars burning, pyrotechnics, or other heat sources that may make you feel unsafe? Are there safety systems in place such as alternative exits, sprinklers, and smoke alarms? Ask the management for clarification on your concerns. If you do not feel safe in the building, leave immediately.

During an emergency

· React immediately

If an alarm sounds, you see smoke or fire, or other unusual disturbance immediately exit the building in an orderly fashion.

· Get out, stay out!

Once you have escaped, stay out. Under no circumstances should you ever go back into a burning building. Let trained firefighters conduct rescue operations.

The 10 deadliest nightclub fires in world history

1. Cocoanut Grove nightclub, Boston, MA

November 28, 1942

Deaths: 492

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 6.3 MB)

2. Disco/dance hall, Luoyang, China. (Fire began elsewhere in shopping plaza and spread to disco.) December 25, 2000

Deaths: 309

3. Rhythm Club dance hall, Natchez, MS April 23, 1940

Deaths: 207

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 940 KB)

4. Cromagnon Republic club, Buenos Aires, Argentina

December 30, 2004

Deaths: 194

5. Beverly Hills Supper Club, Southgate, KY

May 28, 1977

Deaths: 165

Members: NFPA fire investigation report (PDF, 7.3 MB)

6. Ozone Disco Club, Quezon City, Philippines March 18, 1996

Deaths: 160

7. Lame Horse Nightclub, Perm, Russia

December 4, 2009

Deaths: 154 (best information available as of January 7, 2010)

8. Club Cinq, St. Laurent du Pont, France

November 20, 1971

Deaths: 143

9. The Station nightclub, W. Warwick, RI

February 20, 2003

Deaths: 100

10. HappyLandSocialClub,Bronx,NY

March 25, 1990

Deaths: 87