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Allergy, asthma sufferers may have Thunder Fever to blame for rise in symptoms

Allergy, asthma sufferers may have Thunder Fever to blame for rise in symptoms
Allergy, asthma sufferers may have Thunder Fever to blame for rise in symptoms
Posted at 6:38 AM, May 24, 2018
and last updated 2018-05-24 02:38:20-04

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) - With all of the rain that we've seen lately, allergy and asthma sufferers have likely seen a rise in their symptoms.

WTXL's Jada Williams took a look at how is rain connected to asthma and allergies.

The science behind it is pretty complicated, but to put it simply, that pollen floating around ends up being carried by the wind up into the clouds. There those pollen particles break.

And when it comes back down, those particles are so small that they slip right pass the natural filters in your body.

The phenomenon is called Thunder Fever or Thunderstorm Asthma.

While it sounds scary, the good news is this isn't a problem that arises after a couple of rainstorms.

The issue is more commonly found in Australia and UK where the weather is even more unpredictable than here in Florida.

But an allergist, Dr. Ron Saff, says you should still be aware of the problem and what to do.

"Every asthmatic, whether you're in a thunderstorm or not, should, ideally, have their asthma under good control," Saff says."So you want to be sure your taking your inhalers, you want to follow your doctor's advice. Take your inhalers as directed. The other thing, common sense of course, is that if there's a thunderstorm outside whether you have asthma or not you should be indoors."

And of course, make sure you see your doctor if you're feeling under the weather.

Even if you're not suffering from thunderstorm asthma, allergy season is still upon us.